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Chinese billionaire convicted in UN bribery case

In this Oct. 26, 2015 photo, Chinese billionaire Ng Lap Seng waves to the media as he leaves federal court. AP NEW YORK — A Chinese billionaire who wanted to build a United Nations center in Macau and was accused of illegally paying hundreds of thousands of dollars to U.N. ambassadors to make it happen was convicted at his bribery trial on Thursday. The verdict was returned in Manhattan federal court against Ng Lap Seng, one of China’s richest men. Ng was convicted of bribery, conspiracy and money laundering charges. Acting…

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Newsbook: 3 Books That Delve Into What Work Means to Us

Work, and our relationship to it, is evolving. On Thursday, Google.org, the tech giant’s philanthropic arm, announced a $50 million initiative to support organizations preparing people for the changing job market. Employee priorities are shifting, and companies, particularly in the tech world, are responding by offering enhanced benefits, more flex time (like summer hours) and other in-office perks. In the three novels below, the characters’ time at the office interacts with their personal lives in various ways — in one case the former threatens to completely engulf the latter. Photo…

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Lawyer for Wasserman Schultz’ ex-IT aide: Fraud count might be ‘placeholder’ for more charges

The attorney for a House IT staffer arrested this week as he was trying to leave the country fired back at the feds in an interview with Fox News, while also speculating that the bank fraud count he faces could be a “placeholder” for more charges. Imran Awan — a former IT aide for Rep. Debbie Wasserman Schultz, D-Fla., who had kept him on the payroll for months — has been at the center of a congressional computer equipment scandal. Law enforcement officials from multiple federal agencies were involved in…

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Asia and Australia Edition: U.S. Senate, Jerusalem, Jeff Bezos: Your Friday Briefing

The context, experts emphasized, was the American principle of civilian control over the military, but the effect was chilling, particularly at a time when North Korea’s nuclear threat is increasing and trust that mutually assured destruction would forestall any nuclear attack appears to be decreasing. Continue reading the main story _____ Photo Credit Kimimasa Mayama/European Pressphoto Agency • The Japanese Ministry of Defense delivers its conclusions today about whether Prime Minister Shinzo Abe’s government deliberately withheld information about the safety of Japanese troops at a U.N. compound in South Sudan….

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Andrew Paulson, Chess Impresario and Serial Entrepreneur, Dies at 58

Invited to Russia for a photo shoot in 1993, Mr. Paulson remained for 15 years. He enlisted local partners in publishing several periodicals: Afisha, a Russian entertainment and listings guide; Bolshoi Gorod, a free version of a Sunday newspaper supplement; and MIR, a monthly travel magazine. In 2006, a year after his publishing venture was acquired by a Russian company, he and Alexander Mamut, a billionaire Russian banker, founded SUP Media. The group became an online pioneer and bought LiveJournal, a social networking service. (It is still operating.) Mr. Paulson…

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Right and Left React to Trump’s Transgender Ban

_____ • Max Boot in Commentary: “This may be good politics, but it’s bad policy.” Mr. Boot argues that Mr. Trump’s tweets on the transgender issue are a way of deflecting “attention from the multiple crises besetting his presidency” and an attempt “to try to stay in the good graces of the religious right.” Moreover, he notes, the president’s announcement is conspicuously absent of details, “leaving it to someone else to work out the actual policy he just announced.” Read more » _____ From the Left • Gersh Kuntzman in…

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Did Cubs’ World Series win cause a Chicago baby boom?

Meet the youngest crop of Chicago Cubs fans, all born about nine months after the team’s historic World Series win – you do the math. Hospitals in Chicago are recording a surge in the number of births and the babies are being called Chicago’s “World Series Babies.” They could be given names like Ivey, Clarke and maybe even Wrigley. Natalie and Joe Pelnar say they have the Cubs to thank for getting pregnant. They welcomed their baby boy Addison last week, named for the street outside Wrigley Field. “We literally…

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Gr: Andrew Paulson, Chess Impresario and Serial Entrepreneur, Dies at 58

Invited to Russia for a photo shoot in 1993, Mr. Paulson remained for 15 years. He enlisted local partners in publishing several periodicals: Afisha, a Russian entertainment and listings guide; Bolshoi Gorod, a free version of a Sunday newspaper supplement; and MIR, a monthly travel magazine. In 2006, a year after his publishing venture was acquired by a Russian company, he and Alexander Mamut, a billionaire Russian banker, founded SUP Media. The group became an online pioneer and bought LiveJournal, a social networking service. (It is still operating.) Mr. Paulson…

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In U.S. first, scientists edit genes of human embryos

For the first time in the United States, scientists have edited the genes of human embryos, a controversial step toward someday helping babies avoid inherited diseases.    According to MIT Technology Review, which first reported the news on Wednesday, the experiment was just an exercise in science — the embryos were not allowed to develop for more than a few days and were never intended to be implanted into a womb.     Officials at Oregon Health & Science University confirmed that the work took place there and said results would be published…

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