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New C.D.C. Chief Saw Coca-Cola as Ally in Obesity Fight

Coke — which, like the C.D.C., is based in Atlanta — has also had two employees on Georgia Shape’s advisory board, in various years. One was Rhona S. Applebaum, Coke’s chief science and health officer. She left the company in 2016 after The Times reported that she had helped orchestrate a strategy of funding scientists who encouraged the public to focus on exercise and worry less about how calories contribute to obesity. Ben Sheidler, a Coke spokesman, said that someone from the Georgia Department of Public Health had solicited the…

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Without Visas, Carnival Workers Are Trapped at Home in Mexico

As American politicians and business owners wrangle over the limits on the number of H-2B visas for unskilled, nonagricultural workers, Tlapacoyan (pronounced tla-pa-COY-an), with about 60,000 residents in the town and surrounding area, offers a glimpse of how the impasse has stung in Mexico. Last year, Mexicans received more than 70 percent of the approximately 84,000 H-2B visas issued by the United States to migrant workers worldwide. Photo Martín Peña and his mother, Lucía Pérez, in the kitchen of their home outside Tlapacoyan. Mr. Peña spent two seasons with an…

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For Ethiopia’s Underemployed Youth, Life Can Center on a Leaf

“If you’re a chewer in these parts, you’re a dead, dead man,” said Abhi, 30, who asked that his last name not be used because his family “will no longer consider me as their son.” Most alarming, the Ethiopian authorities say, is the number of young people in this predominantly young nation now consuming khat. About half of Ethiopia’s youth are thought to chew it. Officials consider the problem an epidemic in all but name. The country’s government, which rules the economy with a tight grip, is worried that the…

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News Analysis: Trump’s Attack on Russia Inquiry Is From Familiar Playbook: The Clintons’

But the strategy has driven a wedge inside Mr. Trump’s political and legal teams. Some of Mr. Trump’s lawyers have argued that the president is better off not undermining Mr. Mueller, a former F.B.I. director who served presidents of both parties and enjoys broad bipartisan respect in Washington. If the president has done nothing wrong, they argue, then allowing Mr. Mueller to come to that conclusion on his own would be the best way of finally dispensing with the suspicions of collusion with Russia during last year’s election. An exoneration…

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Races Are Reversed in a Police Killing, and Again a Family Asks: Why?

The events of the next few minutes will be anatomized and argued over and, maybe, at some point, contested in court. But this much is established: As the squad car she had summoned slid down the alley, Justine Damond went up to the police officers inside, one of whom, for reasons still unknown, fired his gun, hit her in the abdomen and killed her. Even to Americans now used to dissecting police shootings, the circumstances were an odd jolt: a black Somali-American cop, firing at a white Australian woman among…

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Pittsburgh Gets a Tech Makeover

Much has been made of the “food boom” in Pittsburgh, and the city has long had a thriving arts scene. But perhaps the secret, underlying driver for both the economy and the cool factor — the reason Pittsburgh now gets mentioned alongside Brooklyn and Portland, Ore., as an urban hot spot for millennials — isn’t chefs or artists but geeks. In a 2014 article in The Pittsburgh Post-Gazette, Mayor Bill Peduto compared Carnegie Mellon, along with the University of Pittsburgh, to the iron ore factories that made this city an…

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