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New C.D.C. Chief Saw Coca-Cola as Ally in Obesity Fight

Coke — which, like the C.D.C., is based in Atlanta — has also had two employees on Georgia Shape’s advisory board, in various years. One was Rhona S. Applebaum, Coke’s chief science and health officer. She left the company in 2016 after The Times reported that she had helped orchestrate a strategy of funding scientists who encouraged the public to focus on exercise and worry less about how calories contribute to obesity. Ben Sheidler, a Coke spokesman, said that someone from the Georgia Department of Public Health had solicited the…

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Saturday Profile: The Female Warlord Who Had C.I.A. Connections and Opium Routes

Ms. Yang partnered with remnants of the Chinese Nationalist troops who had been defeated by Mao’s Communists but continued to fight from havens in Burma. Intelligence dispatches at the National Archives in Yangon described her as a menace to the peace. The Nationalist troops had won support from the C.I.A., because of their shared interest in stemming the spread of Communism during the early stages of the Cold War. The covert plan, called Operation Paper, included an agreement by which American weapons were airlifted to Southeast Asia using planes owned…

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Legendary wildcatter Boone Pickens takes a Texas-sized fall

The health of T. Boone Pickens, the famed 89-year-old oilfield wildcatter, financier and corporate raider, has taken a turn for the worse after a “Texas-sized fall” put him in the hospital last week. In a posting to LinkedIn, Pickens said that he is still mentally strong but that as far as his life goes, “I clearly am in the fourth quarter.” Pickens, the founder and chairman of the Dallas investment firm BP Capital, suffered several strokes over the holiday and has been undergoing speech therapy. He said that he’s regained…

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Athlete overcomes paralysis to race, coach again

When Beth Sanden crashed her bike after speeding over a wet, broken patch of asphalt 15 years ago, the elite endurance athlete was left paralyzed. She figured her competition days were over, along with her career as a personal trainer and triathlon coach. Actually, they were just beginning. Paralyzed from the rib cage down and told she’d never walk again, she was swimming a year later. Soon after, she was walking with a walker, then a cane. Then she was back to competing in triathlons, albeit not the way she…

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New York Today: New York Today: Your Guide to ‘Cloudgazing’

Photo Clouds over Central Park last month. Credit Sam Hodgson for The New York Times Olé, olé, on this sizzling Thursday. We’re feelin’ hot hot hot. And you will, too, today. It’ll feel as warm as 97 degrees, and a heat advisory remains in effect until 8 p.m. So we turn to the clouds to distract us from the heat. “The clouds tell a story,” said John Homenuk, the founder of New York Metro Weather, a local weather website. Today, you will likely see cirrus clouds, which are wispy, silky-looking,…

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Art Review: Richard Gerstl, Speeding Through Life, With Sparks

Gerstl is frequently referred to as the first Austrian Expressionist, since his work developed slightly ahead of that by the somewhat younger Oskar Kokoschka and Egon Schiele. But at the Neue, that characterization ultimately feels too small and neat. In this show, which was organized by Jill Lloyd, an independent curator, Gerstl is constantly on the move, striking out on his own, and then retreating to familiar territory. Continue reading the main story Over his brief six-year career, he pursued a range of styles, including a sober realism befitting portrait…

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Frances Gabe, Creator of the Only Self-Cleaning Home, Dies at 101

“Locally, she was just the kind of unique person that you often see in these small towns,” Allyn Brown, Ms. Gabe’s former lawyer and a longtime friend, said in a telephone interview last week. “I don’t think anybody really knew her name.” There was a time, however, when Ms. Gabe’s name was known round the world. In the late 20th and early 21st centuries, her house was featured in newspapers and magazines including The New York Times, The Guardian and People; on Phil Donahue’s talk show; and in several books,…

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Bodies Found in Swiss Glacier Could Solve a Mystery From 1942

After two months, the children — five boys and two girls — were divided among families in the neighborhood. The eldest brother, then 13, went to work for a baker; a second brother went to work for a shoemaker and later became a priest, spending decades in Madagascar; two became stone masons; and a fifth worked as a restaurant chef. All five sons have died. Ms. Udry-Dumoulin lived with her aunt, and when she married she moved to another village about 40 minutes away. The siblings were never close, she…

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Mediterranean-style diet linked to lower risk of dementia

Eating right may help protect your brain health in old age, according to four new studies. In particular, the Mediterranean-DASH Intervention for Neurodegenerative Delay (MIND) diet lowered people’s risk of dementia, two studies concluded. The MIND diet is a hybrid of the Mediterranean diet and the DASH (Dietary Approaches to Stop Hypertension) diets, both of which were originally designed to help improve heart health. Seniors who carefully followed the MIND diet had a 35 percent lower risk of declining brain function as they aged. The MIND diet: 10 foods that…

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Artificial sweeteners linked with weight gain

Two-thirds of Americans are overweight, and those who diet sometimes turn to alternative sweeteners — including aspartame, sucralose and stevioside — to cut calories. Now, a new review of many studies suggests that doing so might not be the best idea. The scientists took a comprehensive look at more than 11,000 studies and found that, for overweight individuals or those with high blood pressure (hypertension) or diabetes, the benefits of consuming zero-calorie, “non-nutritive sweeteners” were modest to nil. For other people, there was an increased risk of weight gain, type 2 diabetes, hypertension, stroke and heart disease. [7 Biggest…

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